How Al Gore Jr. Could Have Won the Electoral College Majority and the Presidency in the November 2000 Presidential Election

the results of the 2000 George W. Bush versus Al gore Jr. presidential election could have been different if Al Gore Jr. had taken advantage of his role and authority as President of the United States Senate.  The U.S. Constitution mandates that the Vice President of the United States is automatically the President and presiding officer of the United States Senate.  The US Senate in December 2000 consisted of 50 Democratic Senators and 50 Republican Senators.  That is the Senate consisted of a 50 and 50 tie in terms of Democratic votes versus Republican votes. If a tie vote were to occur in terms of debating and approving which candidate got the electoral votes majority then Vice President Al Gore Jr. would have cast the tie breaking 51st vote to make himself the winner of the electoral college and the winner of the Presidency of the United States. 
       The dispute over electoral college votes was all about who won the electoral votes of the STate of Florida.  The ase was before the Florida Supreme Court and was then reviewed by the U.S. Supreme Court which decided that George W. Bush Jr. won Florida’s electoral votes in the famous case Bush v. Gore in Dec 2000. 
       According to the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. Senate acting in concert with the U.S. House of Representatives, has the final authority to decide which candidate, either Al Gore Jr. or George W. Bush Jr. won electoral votes of each state in the United States, regardless of what each state decided individually in the certification of each state’s popular vote statewide total.  The U.S. Senate acting in concert with the U.S. House of Representatives decides in a U.S. Senate vote on which state was won by the Gore electors and which state was won by the Bush electors. Al Gore could have made a very smart move under the Senate rules of parliamentary procedure and persuaded two Democratic Senators to make a motion to reject the Bush electors from Florida and accept the Gore electors from Florida.  The U.S. Senate would have voted 50 votes to do so from the Democratic Senators and 50 votes to not do so from the Republican Senators.  Then Al Gore could have cast the tie breaking 51st vote to reject Bush electors and Accept the Gore electors from Florida and Gore would have won the majority of the electoral votes from all states and would have been elected President of the United States. Al Gore did not know how to do this under the U.S. Senate Rules of parliamentary procedure. Al Gore was not an attorney, he was a news reporter before serving in the U.S. House of Representatives, and he did not know how to use Article 3 Sections 1-21 to accomplish this act to make himself President.  The Senate has the final say in validating and counting electoral votes for the office of the President of the United States.

Bret Sablosky

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